Leeds Carnegie name strong side for Euro opener

first_img8 Rhys Oakley16 Andy Titterrell17 Mike Macdonald18 Jesus Moreno Rodriquez19 James Craig20 Daniel Browne21 Alex Black22 Ceiron Thomas23 Oliver DentonYou can follow all the action from Bucharest at www.leedscarnegie.com throughout Saturday afternoon with a regularly updated match report throughout the game also there will be match updates appearing on the official club Twitter page at www.twitter.com/carnegierugbyLeeds Carnegie Head Coach Neil Back looks ahead to this Saturday’s Amlin Challenge Cup opening game at Bucharest Oaks, kick off 1pm GMT.How are you approaching this weekend’s game?We have made no secret that our focus this season is on consolidating and building on our achievements last season in the Aviva Premiership. However, the Amlin Challenge Cup gives us an chance to give some game time to players who have been desperate to play in the first five rounds of this season. European competition does bring with it different kinds of challenges that can help freshen things up and we are looking forward to the trip to Romania.Are Bucharest an unknown quantity for you?We haven’t been able to get hold of any footage of them from this season however we obviously played against them last season and the squad looks very similar so we have some idea. Their number eight, who ran the game for them the last time we were in Bucharest, is no longer at the club so that is one threat we do not need to worry about however I am sure they will be wanting to put in a strong performance in their opening game of the competition.In many ways this is similar to how rugby used to be before all the analysis and research on the opposition. You have to just worry about yourself and making sure you are ready to perform regardless of the side you face. You have to react and adapt to what is thrown up and that is what we will be looking for from the players on Saturday. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Leeds Carnegie ShirtLeeds Carnegie coaching duo of Andy Key and Neil Back have named a strong line up for their side’s opening game in the Amlin Challenge Cup at Bucharest Oaks this Saturday, kick off 1pm GMT.Phil Nilsen and Jacob Rowan are the only two players in the starting line up who have not started a game already this season. Leeds Carnegie will be making their second trip to Bucharest in two seasons. Leeds won 10-6 at Bucharest last December.Scotland U20 scrum half Alex Black could make his debut off the bench along with centre Oliver Denton, who is the younger brother of second row Tom Denton. If Oliver comes on, it will be the second time that a pair of brothers have played for Leeds Carnegie, following in the footsteps of the Murphy brothers; Chris and Phil.The squad in full is:15 Leigh Hinton14 Michael Stephenson13 James Tincknell12 Luther Burrell11 Henry Faafili10 Christian Lewis Pratt9 Warren Fury1 Gareth Hardy2 Phil Nilsen3 Miguel Alonso4 Tom Denton5 Sean Hohneck6 Kearnan Myall7 Jacob Rowancenter_img How is your squad shaping up?Thankfully we have had some good news on Danny Paul after he came off injured last week against London Irish. He has suffered some damage to his ribs but we are confident he will be back fit for our next Aviva Premiership game against Sale at Headingley Carnegie. We have a few guys who have picked up some bumps and bruises in the first five rounds of the season and we will have to monitor them before we decide whether to take them on a long away trip in Europe especially as we do not know what conditions we will face. However, whatever team we field on Saturday we are sure they will produce a performance we can be proud of.last_img read more

World Champion Black Ferns ready for England tour

first_imgNew Zealand’s Victoria Grant (C) breaks a tackle from England’s Danielle Waterman (L) during the Women’s Rugby World Cup 2010 Final at Twickenham Stoop Stadium, southwest London, on September 5, 2010. New Zealand won the game 13-10. AFP PHOTO / ADRIAN DENNIS (Photo credit should read ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images) Among those in the squad are new Black Ferns Eloise Blackwell, Rawinia Everitt, Kelani Matapo and Hazel Tubic, all from Auckland and Wellington players Muteremoana Aiatu, Shakira Baker and Katarina Whata and Lydia Crossman from Hawke’s Bay.“The girls are pretty excited.  We have an exciting mix of experienced and new talent which will create some real competition for positions in the starting XV,” she said.Also joining the squad this week is Auckland’s Teresa Te Tamaki who makes a return to the Black Ferns as replacement for Trish Hina who has withdrawn for medical reasons.The Black Ferns squad to tour England is:Muteremoana Aiatu*           WellingtonShakira Baker*                     WellingtonEloise Blackwell*                 AucklandMel Bosman                          Hawke’s BayKelly Brazier^                        CanterburyKendra Cocksedge^                        CanterburyLydia Crossman*                 Hawke’s BayRawinia Everitt*                   AucklandFiao’o Fa’amausili^             AucklandVictoria Grant^ (c)                AucklandTeresa Te Tamaki                AucklandEmma Jensen^                    AucklandJustine Lavea^                     AucklandKelani Matapo*                     AucklandRebecca Mahoney^                        WellingtonAmanda Murphy                  CanterburyKarina Penetito^                  AucklandCasey Robertson^               CanterburyVita Robinson^                     AucklandAmiria Rule                           CanterburyAroha Savage^                     AucklandDoris Taufateau^                 AucklandHazel Tubic*                         AucklandKatarina Whata*                   WellingtonRenee Wickliffe^                  AucklandKathleen Wilton                   Otago Victoria Grant, pictured against Englnd last year, will Captain the side touring EnglandThe four-time Women’s Rugby World Cup (WRWC) champion Black Ferns have assembled in Auckland to prepare for their three Test tour to England this month.The Black Ferns play against WRWC runners-up England on 26 and 29 November and 3 December with the first match at Twickenham following the Australia v Barbarians match.Coach Grant Hansen said the squad members – eight of them new to the Black Ferns this year – have been training in smaller groups heading into their camp today.“Since we announced the squad, the girls have been training individually and in their own home towns in groups.  We have a pretty intense programme for the next few days but it is great to have the whole squad training together.“They are all eager and ready to get the tour under way,” he said.The three Tests against England is the first instalment of a three-year programme that will see the Black Ferns play England again in 2012 and 2013.Captain Victoria Grant welcomed the prospect of secured annual fixtures against England.“It’s always a great contest when we face England and we are all just looking forward to getting there and playing.  The annual series between our two sides will be an important part of ensuring we develop the women’s game,” Grant said. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS *denotes new cap^denotes member of IRB Women’s Rugby World Cup squad 2010Black Ferns 2011 tour to England (local times shown)Saturday 26 November, Black Ferns v England, Twickenham, 5pm (local time)Tuesday 29 November, Black Ferns v England, Esher RFC, 7pmSaturday 3 December, Black Ferns v England, Esher RFC, 2pmlast_img read more

Six Nations: How Eddie Jones will set England up for hostility of Murrayfield

first_imgEddie Jones’ first moment of reckoning with England is nearly upon us but how will his side differ from the one that crashed out of the World Cup? Back playEngland chucked the ball about in the last Six Nations, scoring 18 tries in the process, but got stage fright the closer they got to the World Cup. Jones says they should not be afraid to try things when they are on but no-one is expecting them to play like the Harlem Globetrotters up at Murrayfield in their opening fixture.Pick their moment: The 10-12 axis of George Ford and Owen Farrell will show patience to go wideThat might all change later in the tournament though if England get a couple of wins under their belt early on but, for now, don’t expect a fast and loose game from the visitors in Edinburgh for whom a narrow win will do. England’s most successful side, and we know who they were, did not always throw the ball around – they knew when to stick it up their jumper. The pretty stuff can come later.Keeping them sweetJones let Elliot Daly and Maro Itoje go back to their clubs after the squad’s first gathering but let them know they were in his thoughts by saying they would be 60-plus cap Test players and they would make their debuts before the Six Nations was out. The obvious game to blood this pair, starting or off the bench is the game against Italy, in Rome, on 14 February.On the fringes: Maro Itoje is within a whisker of his first England startThe last time England had a new coach, Lancaster in 2102, they had the same opening two fixtures. Lancaster gave seven players their first caps in the 13-6 win over Scotland but kept the same starting line-up for the 19-15 victory in Rome. Lancaster would have been on the phone to fringe players but by name-checking this pair in public Jones at least made sure they did not go into sulk mode. The pitfallsScotland have not beaten England at Murrayfield since 2008 and have not scored a try in a Calcutta Cup match there since 2004 when Simon Danielli did the business.But they quietly fancy their chances of putting a spoke in the wheel of the Jones bandwagon. And why wouldn’t they? On the face of it a winless Six Nations cannot gloss over the heroics of their World Cup quarter-final loss to Australia.Grease lightning: Stuart Hogg is one of the most dangerous broken-field runners in the gameBut coach Vern Cotter has an improving side on his hands with a decent front row – spearheaded by WP Nel, one of the best goal kickers around in Greig Laidlaw and some decent gas out the back in the shape of Sean Maitland, Stuart Hogg and Mark Bennett, who has been declared fit for action after a shoulder injury. A win for Scotland would probably have more of a positive influence on Vern Cotter’s team than a defeat would affect Eddie Jones, who is still in honeymoon mode and has Italy next up. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img By Adam HathawayThe scrumThe scrum is traditionally England’s strong point and it was all going so well under Graham Rowntree until France did a number on the pack in a World Cup warm-up game in Paris. That sent the alarm bells ringing and the set-piece gradually got worse in the tournament to the point when the scrum was taken to pieces by Australia of all teams.Mangled: England’s scrum was destroyed by Australia in the World CupJones – with Ian Peel on board – has got to fix this quick and we will probably see the hookers hooking for the ball which will quickly end up at the No 8’s feet as it did when he was in charge of Japan. Any team with Dylan Hartley as captain and Billy Vunipola at the back of the scrum won’t be averse to going for the odd pushover either but Jones wants that ball out quick more often than not.Off the pitchIt is hard to get anyone to go on the record about it, but one of the criticisms of the Stuart Lancaster years was that players could never let their hair down. Even five-star luxury 24/7 grates eventually when you are cocooned in your training hotel and Jones has hinted that the squad have already had a couple of nights out. And no, he is not putting a limit on how many beers a player can have but is not expected to find anyone staggering back from Bagshot with 15 pints on board.Bonding: Eddie Jones is not averse to his squad having a few beersDo that and they can expect to be driving home the next morning – if they’ve sobered up – but Jones has told the squad to enjoy themselves now and again and has trusted them not to overdo it.We have already had a taste of the Jones mind games ‘Scotland are favourites’ was reversed pretty quickly at Monday’s offering for the press. Lancaster never got involved in that sort of skulduggery.LeadershipChris Robshaw copped loads during the World Cup especially after the Wales game when some muddled thinking – and not just by the captain – cost England a draw and then a win. If Martin Johnson had turned down a draw, or a throw to the front had been called in the last minute, he had other players around him who were strong enough to question him with Lawrence Dallaglio, Jonny Wilkinson, Neil Back, Matt Dawson and Will Greenwood all ready to put in their two pennyworth.Hard worn experience: Chris Robshaw has captained England 42 times, which will be put to good useIf the new captain Dylan Hartley needs any advice he only has to turn around and there will be a bloke there who has captained England 42 times, more than anyone except Will Carling, standing there. His name is Chris Robshaw and he didn’t have anyone like that around in the World Cup. Hartley will need other leaders to step up – Joe Launchbury, James Haskell, George Ford, Owen Farrell, Danny Care and Ben Youngs have been around long enough not to be scared to throw their opinions in the mix. No inch given: Mike Brown is closed down by the Scottish defence last_img read more

Terry Bouhraoua: “France don’t have a Sonny Bill Williams”

first_img PLENTY OF headlines have been made by the big 15s players coming into sevens. We know of the All Blacks and Wallabies who have come in for this season, hoping to be in the mix when the medals are handed out at the Olympics. But for France captain Terry Bouhraoua, there are only so many 15s boys needed.“It’s difficult to have more than three of these guys in your squad,” Bouhraoua says. “The new players have an obligation to play in the sevens series so they’re ready for the Olympics at the end of the season. But I think three of them would be the maximum.“For France it’s a little different. We don’t have a Sonny Bill Williams or Quade Cooper to come straight into the sevens squad. We don’t have this problem because there aren’t superstars like them in France. And – this is just me talking – I don’t think this is the best solution for our team.”Of course, things can work the other way around. In the past, New Zealand have used sevens to get elite rugby experience for players who would go on to become All Blacks – think Liam Messam or Julian Savea. Scotland have done it too. Now France Sevens have seen their team-mate Virimi Vakatawa score a try on his Test debut against Italy.Big hand: Sonny Bill Williams carries ballBouhraoua says: “I’m very happy for Virimi – it’s good for him, for us and for the 15s. It’s good for everybody. I hope this shows how sevens youngsters can go into 15s.” High stepper: Terry Bouhraoua skips away from the English France’s charismatic captain Terry Bouhraoua tells RW’s Alan Dymock why his side won’t parachute in stars of the 15s game “I have also changed a lot as a player since my first tournament (in 2010). When you start you justgo straight and hard. I’ve learnt to think better during games.”This was first published in the April issue of Rugby World. For the latest subscription offers, click here.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Bouhraoua insists that the French side is more like a club side now – they are more professional, more streamlined than in earlier years.So when there are injuries or drop-outs and players from outside their full-time sevens environment come in, they must catch up. There were only 14 French professional sevens players at the start of the season, and outsiders with Olympic dreams have had to be chucked into series rugby. It hasn’t been easy but Bouhraoua feels now is the time to experiment, before it’s too late.He’s had his own little injuries to overcome too, noticeably during the Wellington Sevens when he damaged his foot. He was cleared but sevens is not a game to hop through, and the fleet-footed skipper is key for France.“I’ve matured over the years,” he says. “Now, as captain, I must prepare the team because anticipation (of problems) is a big part of team success.last_img read more

England advance while the spectre of the All Blacks lurk in the background

first_img TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS But the way the fixtures pan out over the next few years it looks a shade of odds-on that Jones will be wearing the same grin for the at least 12 months that he wore in Sydney in June.Lucky general: Eddie Jones has had his breaks in a hugely successful start as England coachIf were a bookmaker you would have England as favourites to beat South Africa, Fiji, Argentina and Australia in the autumn internationals at Twickenham.The Twickenham brigade have not beaten the Boks since 2006, the closest they came was the 14-14 draw in Port Elizabeth in 2012, but they will fancy their chances this time around.The men with the satchels already have England as favourites to win the Six Nations Slam again, then, with the wind in the right direction on the tour to Argentina, Jones could theoretically be 20 from 20, unlikely but possible with visits to Cardiff and Dublin to come, and still not have played the best team in the world.There will surely be the odd hiccup along the way but England are a short price to still be ranked second in the world come 2018 but they would not been judged against rugby’s ultimate yardstick. And that will be nagging all of their supporters.First up: England haven’t beaten the Springboks since 2006That is great for your job security but the Australian is a shrewd and knows the big test of his team is to come. Some people bleat that we see too much of the southern hemisphere sides and the mystique of the old days has gone but in this case Jones could probably do with a game against New Zealand to see exactly where England are.As he said: “We want to be the No.1 team in the world, and we are miles away from the All Blacks. We’ve got to keep improving. It’s important the players understand they have to keep getting better. Eddie Jones’ England are not scheduled to play New Zealand until 2018 and that can be interpreted as good and a bad thing for the man in charge “New Zealand have been up there all the time and it’s about time someone put in a real challenge to them and we’re going to be the side to put the challenge to them.”Easier said than done and luckily, or unluckily depending how you view it, for Jones it won’t be coming in the foreseeable future. Napoleon famously said he would rather have lucky generals in his ranks than good ones and Eddie Jones definitely both falls into both categories in a rugby sense. He is a great coach, no denying that, but he has had the rub of the green since taking over the England job before Christmas. Gary Player the nine-time golf major winner always maintained that the harder he worked the luckier he got and Jones has a similar work ethic but he has hit the jackpot out on a few things.The Six Nations fixture list worked in his favour, with England’s two easiest away games coming first up, whilst he got used to his squad, and potentially the two toughest opponents arriving at Twickenham before the Grand Slam clincher in Paris.And the Australians had a few big guns missing as Dylan Hartley and co whitewashed them on the summer tour. Jones has also had a fair dollop of good fortune with injuries which can put down to luck or good management or a bit of both.On the way to glory: Jack Nowell takes on the French in the Grand Slam gameBut where he has had a massive dose of good luck is in the fixture list between now and the next World Cup or has he?Jones can do no wrong in English rugby at the moment. Barring a few barbed comments from Exeter’s Rob Baxter, about the national coach’s treatment of Henry Slade, it has all been sweetness and light and with the Test team, under Jones, nine from nine why wouldn’t it be?But he hasn’t played the All Blacks yet……..England have played New Zealand in Test matches 40 times and won just seven, the last coming in 2012 after 20 minutes of Manu Tuilagi-inspired mayhem. Clive Woodward’s team beat them twice and drew with them once but it is pretty thin pickings apart from that.And the good news for Jones is that his current squad only have to play the Kiwis once before the next World Cup – and that is not until 2018. But that is bad news as well.Wrecking ball: Manu Tuilagi skittled the All Blacks in 2012After the first two Bledisloe Cup matches, where New Zealand beat Australia 42-8 in Sydney and 29-9 in Wellington, the Welsh 3-0 series defeat earlier in the summer does not look half as bad as it did at the time, and England’s 3-0 win over the Wallabies does not look quite so good.The All Blacks are so far ahead of the rest of the rugby globe at the moment they are like Tiger Woods in golf in the early 2000s. The latest World Rugby rankings have the New Zealanders on 96.30 points, England miles behind on 89.49 and South Africa tucked in, in third, on 86.41 that is similar to the distance between Usain Bolt and the rest of the pack in the 200m in Rio. If England played Steve Hansen’s team at Twickenham in the autumn the visitors would be about 1-5 in the betting shops. The masters: New Zealand have been the team to beat in recent years last_img read more

Five things we learnt in rugby in September

first_imgFrom high tackles to Hawaii, Paul Williams picks out the key talking points from the past month And true to form, rugby has once again evolved. Hookers or, more specifically, the best hookers are now playing the role of a 1990s inside-centre.Try time: Codie Taylor celebrates scoring for the All Blacks (Getty Images)To watch Codie Taylor play for the All Blacks over the past few weeks has been mesmerising. Mesmerising to the point that Dane Coles, the best hooker in the world pre-injury, has got a massive job on his hands getting the shirt off Taylor.Taylor has taken the role of the modern hooker, created by players such as Keith Wood, to the next stage. That a hooker can sit in the wide channels and have the pace to stretch an outside defence is now a given. Taylor has now created the role of a distributing hooker; a player who can supply perfect passes and offloads to the wings and full-backs who pour through the wide channels. It is now up to the next generation of hookers to follow suit.Leicester – the joyless roller coasterRoller coasters, by their very nature, are supposed to be a mix of vomit-inducing fear tempered with a rush of adrenaline, but above all, the experience should be overwhelmingly pleasurable.This is where the Leicester Tigers’ roller-coaster ride differs. You get the fear, but there is no end and therefore no joy. Sacking head coach Matt O’Connor after the first game was laughable. Not because he should or shouldn’t have stayed, but because that decision should have been made months prior.Geordan Murphy took control of the rickety ride and the first victory over Newcastle Falcons was hugely promising and a climb up the table looked inevitable.Troubled Tigers: Leicester lost to Worcester at home (Getty Images)But since then, Tigers have been beaten by Wasps and conceded 44 points to Worcester at Welford Road. Allowing Worcester, a perennial relegation team, to score six tries with just 31% possession and 31% territory is alarming; allowing that to happen at your home ground is a step beyond even that. An unconvincing win over bottom-of-the-table Sale will have convinced few.How the ride ends, nobody knows. But at the moment it’s looking less Alton Towers and more like one of those fairgrounds you see on the outskirts of a ropey holiday resort.Hawaiian Super RugbyIn a league renowned for its flamboyant ball-handling, Super Rugby’s handling of its structure is currently making the headlines. Talk of opening a franchise in Hawaii is next-level weird.With the possibility of further South African teams joining the Pro14, it’s easy to see why Super Rugby needs to alter its model. But surely expansion into the Pacific Islands is more realistic, even though it may not be as lucrative.Island travel: Will the Crusaders and Lions be playing games in Hawaii soon? (Getty Images)The consortium that has been looking to buy Kiwi NRL franchise the Warriors is also keen to open a Super Rugby franchise in Hawaii. A franchise in Hawaii would make the already bonkers travel schedule even worse – there are astronauts who have spent less time in the air than some Super Rugby squads. But who knows, it could easily happen. And just in case it does, I’ve already grabbed the domain names to cover any further expansion plans. The Atlantis Dolphins, Silver Moons and the Mars Bars are registered to me, so hands off.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Dip in form: Michael Cheika’s team have lost eight of their last ten Tests (Getty Images) Michael Cheika is under pressureNo one likes to see a coach lose their job, unless you’re Jake White of course! But the Wallabies look like they need to make a change. They’re ranked seventh in the world and are arguably at their lowest point since the game went pro. The results, or lack of them, speak for themselves – they’ve lost eight from ten.However, to illustrate the genuine Wallaby worries you need to look at the recent squad selections. That Michel Cheika has ditched Bernard Foley, his long-term option at ten, for Kurtley Beale reeks of panic – especially 12 months out from the World Cup.New at ten: Kurtley Beale in action during the defeat by Argentina (Getty Images)A decision made even more peculiar when you consider that Beale has been so effective at 12 and was arguably the form inside-centre in Test rugby.Add to that Israel Folau being switched to the wing and locks that get fiddled with more than your average Chubb and the Wallabies prospects of reaching the World Cup semi-finals look bleak, which is sad for the game.Being tall isn’t an excuse for high tacklesSeptember saw some high-profile high tackles. The most notable was Will Spencer’s hit on Tommy Taylor, for which he received a four-week ban.The following days opened up the debate regarding whether the new dangerous tackle interpretations skew against taller players. But they don’t. And for many reasons.Seeing red: Will Spencer was sent off for this tackle on Tommy Taylor (Getty Images)Firstly, we’re not talking about Robert Wadlow-type giants here. Spencer is tall, but he is only 6ft 7in tall. With wings and centres in the modern game, regularly hitting 6ft 3in, 6ft 7in is becoming par for the course when it comes to locks.Perhaps the most important piece of evidence against tall players not being able to tackle low is the fact that the game’s giants seem to have no trouble lowering their bodies in other aspects of the game.How many times have you seen a lock fly into a ruck about two feet off the ground? It happens all of the time and they seem to have little trouble in adopting a body position that most reptiles would be pretty happy with.If you can lower your body to clean a ruck, you can lower your body to tackle below the chest.Hooker is the new 12Rugby is in a state of constant flux. The rules and changes in player roles mean that you can see a game of rugby from ten years ago and it looks like a different sport.Watching a Test match from the mid-Nineties, through the lens of today’s rugby, is like watching the Pamplona Bull Run – it seems senselessly violent and it’s only a matter of time before someone gets scooped from the floor covered in blood.last_img read more

Community, personal relationships crucial in disaster

first_imgCommunity, personal relationships crucial in disaster Christchurch bishop talks of experience after devastating earthquakes Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA center_img Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Victoria Matthews leads a prayer following the September 2010 earthquake. Photo/Anglican Taonga[Episcopal News Service – Auckland, New Zealand] The best thing people of faith immediately can do after natural disasters is to provide a sense of community and connect one-on-one with their neighbors, according to New Zealand Diocese of Christchurch Bishop Victoria Matthews.Matthews leads Anglicans in and around the city of Christchurch on New Zealand’s south island. The city and its suburbs are still recovering from a series of earthquakes and aftershocks since a magnitude-7.1 quake struck on Sept. 4, 2010. A magnitude-4.9 temblor on Dec. 26, 2010 and a magnitude-6.3 earthquake followed that on Feb. 22, 2011. The latter quake killed some 185 people and crippled the diocese’s cathedral in the heart of the city.The bishop spoke to Episcopal News Service after news was received about the devastation wrought by Hurricane Sandy while she was attending a portion of the Anglican Consultative Council’s meeting here. In the months since the September 2010 quake, Matthews said, she has learned much about where the church ought to stand.Initially, the bishop said, she told clergy “first of all, make sure your family is OK,” but then to go out and talk to people, and then encourage those they meet to do the same for their neighbors.Her advice to diocesan clergy was “get out, wear your collar and ask people how they are,” she said.Matthews added that experts told her that it was better not to try to get people engaged in long conversations about the disaster “because that re-traumatizes people,” but instead to simply let people know that someone cares enough to find them and ask how they are.And that work needs to continue long past the first anxiety-filled days, Matthews said.Even now, more than two years after the first quake in this traumatic series, the diocese is still running feeding programs in eastern suburbs, where land was hard hit by liquefaction during the quakes. The eastern suburbs also are generally poorer than other parts of Christchurch.The diocese is offering the feeding programs, not because people are hungry for food, Matthews said, but “because community builds resilience.”She has been studying the concept of resiliency and she has come to recognize that “the church is one of the points of resilience for every community.”But, if community is at one point on the resiliency scale, personal relationships are another point on the scale, according to Matthews. People must turn to their neighbors, she said, and ask “do you have two or three people – or even one person – that you have a really strong personal relationship with.“Because if you have someone you can turn to when it’s really hard – and it has been hard – you will get through,” Matthews said. “But if you are isolated and no one reaches out to you to say I will be here for you, you won’t make it. It’s as simple as that.”And, because of that simplicity, diocesan churches have engaged in what the bishop called an old-fashioned practice: “they’ve knocked on doors.” Members have made four rounds in the eastern suburbs, she said.“We knock on doors and if the door is open to us, we say we’re just here to check on you,” Matthews said, adding that the caller asks whether the resident has what he or she needs, whether they are getting out enough and “are you able to get to the store to get your groceries.”“In some cases, if there’s a discussion of faith, we offer to pray with them, but this is not evangelism,” Matthews said. “This is the people of God connecting with God’s people to the glory of God.”“It’s done a lot of good so we shouldn’t ever forget that one-on-one,” she concluded. “Communities are great but the one-on-one is as important as anything.”Matthews also suggested in these days after Hurricane Sandy, it’s important to remember that “everyone is feeling … inadequate and of course you are because it’s a hurricane … we are all inadequate.”The bishop knows first-hand the trauma of disaster. She was in a public building three blocks from the diocesan offices when the February 2011 quake hit and, with others, got under a table. They later realized that part of the building they were in had come down.On the evening of Feb. 23, Matthews was at the tent city set up in Hagley Park, the largest open space in Christchurch. She said she watched and talked with people as hundreds inched forward, in the rain, towards shelter.Matthews’ home sustained much more damage in that temblor than in the September 2010 quake, and for a while she was uncertain where she would sleep and was searching for places to charge her cell phone.A top priority of hers at the time was to find a church, “preferably with running water,” that is safe, and which can become the nerve center for a diocesan relief and pastoral effort.“I want to open that up 24/7 as a place where people can come and pray and receive pastoral care – and a place which clergy can use as a base to go out into the highways and byways to offer pastoral care,” she said then.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 1, 2012 Rector Hopkinsville, KY last_img read more

Mississippi Bishop Duncan Gray calls for election of his successor

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Elections, Comments (2) Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN [Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi] The Episcopal bishop of Mississippi on Feb. 1 formally called for the election of his successor.The Rt. Rev. Duncan M. Gray III announced the beginning of a process which will lead to the election of a bishop coadjutor on May 3, 2014. Gray said that he plans to continue as diocesan bishop until February 2015, at which time the new bishop will succeed him.Gray made his announcement in his opening address to the 186th Annual Council of the Diocese of Mississippi in Jackson. He has served as the ninth diocesan bishop for 10 years, having served two years before as bishop coadjutor. Prior to being elected bishop in 2000, he was rector of St. Peter’s Church in Oxford.The diocese’s elected Standing Committee will oversee the nomination and election of the next bishop. The actual work of the nomination process will be undertaken by a search committee, and the election and ordination will be directed by a transition committee. Both the nominating and transition committees will be named in the coming weeks.The bishop of Mississippi is the chief pastor and canonical overseer for the state’s 85 congregations, clergy and more than 18,000 members.Blessing same-sex unionsIn his address, Gray also announced a discernment process which congregations may voluntarily enter in order to gain his permission to bless same-sex unions. He compared his process to the one implemented by the bishop of Texas.While a general ban on the blessing of same-sex unions remains in place, he will allow congregations which self-select and undergo a thorough process to move toward blessings.Clergy and vestry – the elected lay leaders of a local congregation – will be free to enter into a process of prayer and study on the matter. They will be asked to submit the design and results of their study and also to explain to the bishop how the blessing of same-sex unions would enhance the congregation’s missional efforts. He said he would also require those congregations discerning such a call to describe how they would prepare couples for the blessing liturgy. Congregations would also be required to report back on their experience in time for the 2015 General Convention.Gray said that he is taking the step to keep the issue from dominating the nomination and election of his successor. He also noted that the process is “provisional” and will be allowed only until the 78th General Convention of the Episcopal Church in 2015. He said that the blessing liturgy provisionally approved by the 2012 General Convention is “not marriage,” something which would not be allowed under state law and “which my own conscience would not accept.”He said: “No priest, no vestry, no congregation will be asked to do anything that violates their conscience. This liturgy will only be authorized in congregations that have met” the criteria and have petitioned for permission. By Scott LenoirPosted Feb 4, 2013 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Mississippi Bishop Duncan Gray calls for election of his successor Discernment process for blessing same-sex unions announced Press Release Service Human Sexuality, House of Bishops, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA February 5, 2013 at 10:48 am He said: “No priest, no vestry, no congregation will be asked to do anything that violates their conscience. This liturgy will only be authorized in congregations that have met” the criteria and have petitioned for permission.” I’m sure conservatives in this diocese are wondering why they should believe this statement when the bishop appears to have ignored the statement he made to the diocesas council just ten years ago. If I were a conservative I would have genuine concerns that there will remain a place for me in TEC ten years or less down the road. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY walter combs says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector Columbus, GA February 5, 2013 at 1:15 pm As a non-canonically resident retired priest now living in the Diocese of Mississippi, I know Bishop Gray to be a man of deep prayer, pastoral sensitivity, and unassailable integrity with a great love for the Episcopal Church and the people of this diocese. In walking this ‘middle way’ I believe he is acting in a manner that is totally consistent with our Anglican heritage. The unity of our church has never been found in conformity of belief but, rather, in our common prayer and worship. In my opinion, Bishop Gray is attempting to bridge the gap between those on both sides of the issue in a way that will allow the church in Mississippi to move forward as one entity. I applaud him for his action. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Jane Alexander says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Same-Sex Blessings TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments are closed.last_img read more

Out of Deep Waters: Jericho Road expands from house building…

first_img Comments (3) Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Video September 2, 2015 at 2:02 pm Jericho Road Episcopal Housing Initiative was indeed honored to be supportedby the National Episcopal Church Women. Sponsoring a single home was one of theideas initially explored with the ECW leadership, but in the end it was decidedthat the funds required to build one home were more than they could commit toraising. In order to impact as many homebuyers as possible the ECW decided thatfunds raised would go to support gap financing for homebuyers in need.On July 13, 2009, in my address to the ECW Triennial meeting in Anaheim I said: ” I ampleased to announce today, that your contributions will form the initial corpusof the Jericho Road American Dream Fund. This fund will bring the dream of homeownership to many low-wealth families by filling the gap between the price ofthe home, and the loan amount for which the homebuyers have qualified.”The ECW set a goal of $110,000 and received donations totaling$74,995.86. During this time Jericho Road provided soft second mortgages to 4families in the amount of $169,186 using funds from the ECW campaign inaddition to other donations.In order to ensure that there is no ambiguity in this matter, JerichoRoad has spoken to the immediate past ECW president, the Rev Deacon Nancy R. Crawford who confirms that Jericho Road’s use of ECW funds was compeltely consistant with the ECW Board’s intentions. Marylin Day says: Rector Bath, NC Katrina+10, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Episcopal News Service – New Orleans, Louisiana] Jericho Road Episcopal Housing Initiative grew out of the ruins on Hurricane Katrina and is going strong 10 years later, albeit with a bigger mission.Eighty percent of the residents of Central City, the neighborhood behind Christ Church Cathedral, which faces the upscale Garden District, were renters when Katrina struck. Landlords received no government assistance to rebuild. “Low-income folks in this neighborhood didn’t have any homes to come back to,” said Holly Heine, Jericho Road’s director of operations and communications.Executive Director Nicole Barnes said Jericho Road has realized that “you can’t just build houses; you have to build a community.”That community building includes not only forming neighborhood associations that help residents get to know their neighbors and learn how to advocate for themselves, it involves reclaiming blighted properties and it also involves helping the many first-time homeowners develop the skills that will allow them to sustain their ownership for as long as they desire, Barnes explained.“The arc of ministry has been amazing,” said the Very Rev. David du Plantier, Christ Church Cathedral’s dean.This video is the fifth in a weeklong series of Episcopal News Service coverage. Other videos and stories are here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg and Matthew Davies are editor/reporters for the Episcopal News Service. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing The Very Rev David duPlantier says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Relief & Development, Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Out of Deep Waters: Jericho Road expands from house building to community building Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC September 2, 2015 at 6:54 pm When I first came in contact with Jericho I was very impressed with their stated mission and their staff. In an effort to support them I asked for materials that I could share with my family. Two e-mails and two phone calls later I had received nothing. By Mary Frances Schjonberg and Matthew DaviesPosted Sep 1, 2015 Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Mollie Williams says: Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME September 1, 2015 at 4:25 pm When the Episcopal Church Women selected Jericho Road as their charity for the Triennial a few years ago, the money was not used in the agreed manner. It was to build one home (fundraising goal) and let the ECW communicate and relate to the new homeowner. It was never confirmed what the actual funds were used for in this charity. I am sure it was for something needed but when a grant purpose is discussed and agreed upon, all parties should comply. That is “best practices.’ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments are closed.last_img read more

Video: Jericho Road

first_img Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Video Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Posted Jul 21, 2016 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Video: Jericho Road Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL 4:03[Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] On Thursday, July 21, Thursdays at 2 features Jericho Road in Louisiana, an Episcopal Housing Initiative.The video is available here and is also available closed-captioned.Thursdays at 2 is a weekly preview of Episcopal Church innovative ministries. Every Thursday at 2 pm Eastern, a new video illustrating the work of congregations and individuals will be posted on the Episcopal Church’s Facebook page here and YouTube Channel here Produced by the Episcopal Church Office of Communications, previously posted videos featured on Thursdays at 2 include:• Jennifer Caldwell  and Episcopal Moments• Bluestone Farms and the Community of the Holy Spirit• The Abundant Table• Missional Voices• Presiding Bishop Michael Curry on World Refugee Day 2016• Church on the Square in Baltimore• Episcopal Church Advocacy• Missional Communities• Mobile Loaves and Fishes, a food truck ministry in the Diocese of Rhode Island• Re-membering and Re- Imagining, a report from the House of Bishops.• Double Down on Love, an original song from the Thad’s Band in Santa Monica, CA, Diocese of Los Angeles• The Slate Project, an Episcopal, Lutheran and Presbyterian congregation that exists online and in person.• The Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, Presiding Bishop’s Canon for Reconciliation and Evangelism, providing an update on recent church planting meetings.• The Rev. Scott Claasan of St Michael’s University Church reflecting on how music and surfing led him back to church.For more information contact Mike Collins, Episcopal Church Manager of Multimedia, at [email protected]last_img read more