DDTV: AERIAL FOOTAGE OF CARRIGART ST PATRICK’S DAY PARADE

first_imgREMEMBER the days you were happy with a black and white snap of your local St Patrick’s Day parade.Well everything – almost everything – has gone up several gears. Lionel Hemmerle used a drone to capture the scene yesterday in Carrigart.And it’s pretty special.Press play to watch:  DDTV: AERIAL FOOTAGE OF CARRIGART ST PATRICK’S DAY PARADE was last modified: March 18th, 2016 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:aerial footageCarrigartSt Patrick’s Daylast_img read more

Rangers pounce on Athletics pitcher, new dad Brett Anderson

first_imgOAKLAND — A new dad couldn’t make a 3-0 lead stand up and the Oakland A’s offense went cold in an 11-3 loss to the Texas Rangers on Thursday night.Home after a tough seven-game road trip against division leaders Minnesota and Houston, the A’s figured to have the edge against a Rangers team that had dropped nine of 10.They staked Brett Anderson to a three-run lead in the first and he held Texas scoreless for four innings.But three days after his wife delivered their first child, Anderson ran …last_img

The abundant Nguni herds

first_imgSo you think a cow is a cow is a cow? Think again. South Africa’s indigenous Nguni cattle, long the mainstay of traditional Zulu culture, are possibly the most beautiful cattle in the world, with their variously patterned and multicoloured hides everywhere in demand.Their beauty and the lore and terminology that has become associated with them in Zulu culture is celebrated in a richly illustrated coffee table book called The Abundant Herds, which has fast become a worldwide bestseller.First published in November 2003, the book was sold out by the end of the year. The reprint of June 2004 was entirely snapped up by September of that year, and it was printed again in November 2004. The third reprint appeared in December 2005.The Abundant Herds: A Celebration of the Nguni Cattle of the Zulu People is an appreciation of the creative imagination and linguistic versatility of the Zulu people. Written by acclaimed author Marguerite Poland and social anthropologist David Hammond-Tooke, it is an overview of the history of the Nguni cattle and their economic, social, political and spiritual importance to the Zulu people, both past and present.There are two species of cattle in the world: Bos taurus, or European cattle, are the more familiar brown-and-black breeds such as Jersey and Holstein. Bos indicus, on the other hand, are found mainly in India and Africa, and include more unusual creatures such as Zebu, Sanga and Nguni cattle. They are characterised by their enormous horns and magnificent hides.With beautiful oil and watercolour paintings and sepia drawings by artist Leigh Voigt, The Abundant Herds examines the role played by cattle and cattle-related imagery in the oral tradition of the Zulu people – how cattle terminology can form part of the worldview associated with Zulu culture.For hundreds of years, the well-being of the herds and the Zulu people have been so closely connected that cattle have become a part of the people’s spiritual and aesthetic lives.The poetry of namingThis has given rise to a poetic and complex naming practice. The Abundant Herds explains that the fine and subtle nuance of the isiZulu language captures the delicate interrelationship between cattle terminology and the natural world, where the colour and pattern of a hide or the shape of a pair of horns is linked to images in nature.In a chapter called The Poetry of Naming, Poland discusses this colour-pattern terminology, its origins and its metaphorical associations with natural phenomena such as birds, animals and plants. Animals with specific colours and patterns on their hides are given unique Zulu names, which translate as follows:The eggs of the lark – a creamy coat spotted with fine rust speckles.The gaps between the branches of the trees silhouetted against the sky – a deeply dappled animal.The hornbill takes to flight – a dark beast which shows a flash of white beneath its flank when its walks.What stabs the rain – the upright points of a young steer’s horns.While these terms form the core of a fascinating system of classification, cattle imagery also abounds in Zulu oral history and poetry; in tales, proverbs, riddles and the praises of individual beasts, celebrated by their owners for their fertility, their vigour and their character and which subtly reflect the changing fortunes and social concerns of the Zulu people.Although cattle terms continue to be used today among peasant farmers in rural communities throughout Africa, for the younger, urban generation this knowledge is fading. Despite the resurgence of interest in the economic importance of Sanga-Nguni cattle in South Africa today, there is a real danger that a precious branch of indigenous knowledge will disappear.The aim of this work is not only to record something of this heritage for posterity but also to celebrate the richness of Zulu linguistic versatility and the creative imagination of the Zulu people.The authorsDr Marguerite Poland is a distinguished writer, having published 10 children’s books before turning to adult fiction. She has received the Percy Fitzpatrick Award and the Sankei Honourable Award for Children’s Books for the Japanese translation of The Mantis and the Moon. In May 2005, at the Literary awards, she was presented with a Lifetime Achievers Award in English by Arts and Culture Minister Pallo Jordan. The Abundant Herds is based on research for her doctoral thesis at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, awarded in 1997.The late Professor David Hammond-Tooke was Professor Emeritus of Social Anthropology at Wits University. He conducted extensive research among South African groups, especially the South Nguni and North Sotho, and his theoretical interests included kinship, local government, religion, folklore, indigenous symbolic systems, historiography and comparative ethnography.Leigh Voigt is an internationally acclaimed artist, known particularly for her paintings of birds and wildlife. She has illustrated eight books and has exhibited in South Africa, Europe, Great Britain, Canada and the US, where her work is represented in numerous private and public collections. Lulu Phezulu: Leigh Voigt’s African Album, her autobiographical account of life in the bushveld, which she both wrote and illustrated, won the prestigious BookData Booksellers’ Award in 2000.The Abundant Herds: A Celebration of the Nguni Cattle of the Zulu People (ISBN 1 874950 69 5) is published by Fernwood Press.last_img read more

Women in Wine first for South Africa

first_img3 May 2013Women in the Cape winelands are standing up to be counted, and are now producing their own wine, bottled under the label Women in Wine.A group of 20 women, all with backgrounds in the wine industry, formed the company seven years ago, with “the dream of giving women, especially farm workers and their families, a share in the industry”.With varied skills in marketing, wine analysis, finance, development and training, and social responsibility, the one thing the partners all had in common was that they all “enjoy a glass of quality wine”.Women in Wine is the first South African wine-producing company that is owned, controlled and managed entirely by women.“To date, women have made a significant contribution to the Cape’s wine industry without receiving recognition or benefiting from the industry’s business opportunities,” says Beverly Farmer, a founder member and the chief executive.The company has several unique features. “Women in Wine embraces change in an industry which is 365 years old,” explains Farmer. “We are the first company owned, controlled and managed by women, and black women in particular.”Skills development through collaborationThe partners are all too aware that seasonal workers, who are often women, are unemployed for the rest of the year.The company strives to create a second source of income for these women by identifying “skills development and training opportunities in collaboration with other organisations”.A Women’s Workers’ Trust has been set up, which has shares in the company.Women in Wine also works closely with organisations like the South African Wine Industry Trust.This trust aims to restructure the wine industry to represent the interests of all those involved more effectively, in particular the farm workers, by building a shared consciousness through providing information, platforms for dialogue, education and co-ordination, and by promoting ethical trading.Women in Wine is also a founder member of the African Vintner Alliance, a joint action group established three years ago for the growth of black businesses in the wine industry.“During this period we have worked hard to establish a foothold in this traditional industry by working in collaboration with each other to enter and develop new markets,” Farmer says.Women in Wine only sources wine from farms that comply with socio-economic legislation with specific reference to ethical and environmental practices, employment conditions, skills development and training, as well as that address aspects of black economic empowerment.Ready overseas marketThe group has found a ready overseas market for its product. It produces six wines: a sauvignon blanc, cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon/shiraz, pinotage rose, and chardonnay chenin blanc.The wines are exported to the US, China, Ireland, Spain, Sweden and Denmark, and are available locally in Makro stores nationwide. They can also be ordered online from the Women in Wine website.Some of its export destinations have their own well-established wine industries but they have embraced the Women in Wine label.Farmer believes the reason for this is that importers are interested in the story behind the brand. “The partnership between professional women and farm worker women is a truly South African story.”Two years ago, Women in Wine was nominated in the category Ethical Business Award by the prestigious international magazine, The Drinks, in the UK.Women in Wine has recognised that there are other ways of producing wine. The company was established without the huge capital investment needed for a traditional vineyard with rows of vines stretching into the distance, and a vast cellar.Instead, it has entered into partnerships with existing cellars, as well as with bottling and packaging companies, to produce its wine.‘Transforming South Africa’s wine industry’“In order to achieve our vision of contributing to the transformation of the South African wine industry, we have had to come up with creative solutions that break with traditional perceptions that to produce excellent wines you have to have land, vineyards, cellars and a big company for exports.Instead we have invested in the building of the Women in Wine brand,” explains Farmer, who has a journalism degree and worked on wine farms, representing farm workers and their families, before she became chief executive of Women in Wine.One such partnership is with Boland Kelder, which is the group’s leading wine supplier. Its product development team, with well-known international wine makers on the panel, made Women in Wine’s first two Eden’s Vineyards wines to its specifications.In 2011, the South African wine industry had more than 3 500 wine producers, with 582 wine cellars, and 100 000 hectares under vine. In that year, 831-million litres of wine were produced in the Western Cape. In 2012, over 400-million litres of wine were exported, with the UK and Germany taking the biggest slice, at 22% and 19%, respectively.The wine industry in South Africa goes back 350 years, when the Dutch governor, Jan van Riebeeck, produced the country’s first wine in 1659.First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more